Campaigning for Policy Change

Last year, we continued the ght to ensure that pancreatic cancer isn’t forgotten, overlooked, or underfunded by policy makers.

We raised awareness

We raised awareness

Two out of three people in the UK can’t name a symptom of pancreatic cancer and so we worked with parliamentarians across the UK to shine a spotlight on the disease.

We helped the All Party Parliamentary Group on Pancreatic Cancer launch an inquiry into early diagnosis, and were mentioned by the Chair of the Group at Prime Minister’s Questions.

We made huge breakthroughs with the inclusion of pancreatic cancer in the new Cancer Strategy in Wales and a pilot of raising awareness of abdominal symptoms as part of Public Health England’s Be Clear on Cancer campaign. We also joined a number of specialist groups, including the Wales Cancer Alliance, to ensure that the voice of people with pancreatic cancer is heard.


We fought for more research and fairer access to treatment

We fought for more research and fairer access to treatment

The more clinical trials there are, the faster we can make the breakthroughs that patients are relying on. And in May, we launched the clinical trials part of our ‘Key to Survival’ campaign to increase the number of people taking part in them. We also unveiled our online Clinical Trial Finder to make it easier for patients to nd their nearest trial.

We responded to a number of National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) consultations, and joined forces with other pancreatic cancer charities to call for greater access to treatments that could give patients precious extra time with their families. We also asked supporters to join the fight by adding their name to our Every Month Matters petition – and the response we received was fantastic, over 4,500 people have signed so far.


We created a taskforce for less survivable cancers

We created a taskforce for less survivable cancers

Progress in the survival rates for pancreatic cancer has been woefully slow, but it’s not the only cancer with a poor prognosis. In collaboration with charities representing other less survivable cancers, we have formed the Less Survivable CancerTaskforce to campaign for a signi cant improvement in survival rates by 2025. Because our voices are louder together.

We also ran eight Living with Pancreatic Cancer Support Days around the country, giving people with pancreatic cancer and their loved ones the chance to hear about the support that’s on offer, what to expect when living with pancreatic cancer, and the opportunity to meet others going through a similar experience.